Single Jews Are Flocking to Facebook to Find Love in These Matchmaking Groups

Single Jews Are Flocking to Facebook to Find Love in These Matchmaking Groups

The world of dating can be rough. There are bars and parties, organized singles groups, websites and apps, swiping right and swiping left. Melamed believes matchmaking is in her blood. Originally from Boro Park in Brooklyn, Melamed says her mother has done matchmaking for decades. After high school, Chani herself, caught the bug and dabbled in matchmaking. She was successful and became a matchmaker with Saw You at Sinai, a dating and matchmaking website with an Orthodox bent, although it serves Jews of all backgrounds. And yes, Chani and David were set up by a mutual acquaintance. She is also a health coach for Optavia, a weight-loss program. S ince Chani and David Melamed moved to Denver six-and-a-half years ago, she has continued to do matchmaking on a national basis, both through Saw You at Sinai and her own network of contacts.

With a little help, South Florida singles fulfill their resolution to marry

As far as matchmakers are concerned, love is like poison. Or so claims Khaykelson, a character in a one act play by Avrom Reisen. And Khaykelson might know. Matchmakers played an important role in Yiddish culture. Matchmakers appear in Yiddish literature, folksongs, and film.

Professor Mirjam Zadoff shares the cultural history of ‘shidduchim’ (Jewish matchmaking), the ‘dating project’ focuses on strategies of building.

In one hand she holds a filing card with a photograph stapled to it. In the other is her phone. She peers at the card and tells the rabbi on the end of the line: “Her parents are separated, not divorced. Sirota flips the card over and reads out a couple of names and phone numbers: references provided by the young woman for community elders who will attest to her character. All being well, a meeting between the pair will be arranged and then, Sirota hopes, an engagement. Sirota, 67, is a shadchan, a traditional Jewish matchmaker.

Beneath the vaulted ceilings of her house in Mea Shearim, one of the earliest settlements outside the Old City walls and home to the strictest adherents of the Jewish faith, a wicker basket of filing cards lies on a large cloth-covered dining table. Some are clipped together with laundry pegs: these are couples Sirota has introduced and who are now dating with a view to marriage.

Although there have been tentative steps to introduce an online shadchan service, Sirota handwrites all her notes, and sifts information and evaluates possible connections in her head. She is dismissive of a computerised system. A computer has no intuition, and “when you write things out by hand, it goes up your arm and into your brain and stays there,” she says.

Dating for over 60s

One of longest traditions of matchmaking is in Jewish communities in Eastern Europe and Russia, with the height of this tradition occurring in the Middle Ages. There, a professional matchmaker, known as a shadkhan plural shadkanim , had an extremely important profession because of the relative isolation of the small communities and the fact that courtship was actually frowned upon. Search this site.

The Young Woman.

One of longest traditions of matchmaking is in Jewish communities in Eastern Europe and Russia, with the height of this tradition occurring in the Middle Ages.

Davis is quite rare, a matchmaker who does things the artisanal way, setting up singles through dinner parties, not apps or algorithms. She started hosting at least one Shabbat dinner a month in Davis got access to mentors, donors and business classes to put her vision in place. Labe Eden, a committee member at PresenTense who has attended a few Shabbatness dinners, says he was struck by Davis and her idea from the get go. He explains it as a more wholesome experience than dating at a bar.

The idea could seem old school—but each dinner has its own special twist. One night it was Magic and Macarons, where a Jewish magician performed and macarons were served for dessert. And her next one will feature only male homosexual couples. Even with modern traditions, the core of the evening is Judaism.

Tradition meets technology

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Here’s a closer look at another “Just Married” story from JMM collections the most significant matchmaking program in Jewish history.

We pride ourselves on our ability to find a perfect match for everyone. We recognize that the practice of matchmaking has been around for centuries. One of the longest traditions of matchmaking is in Jewish communities within Eastern Europe and Russia. A Jewish matchmaker is referred to as a shadchan. It is said that the very first shadchan is God, as he matched up Adam and Eve.

As well in the Torah, it is stated that people must pay fees to their shadchan. In traditional and Orthodox Jewish communities, the shadchan was integral to their lives. Jewish law prohibits the sexes to intermingle, which led to the shadchan being responsible for the pairings. As well, when Jews lived in isolated communities, the shadchan would risk traveling long distances to discover the potential matches that existed in different communities. The further the distance traveled, the more money that a matchmaker would receive.

Payment did start to corrupt the practice of matchmaking as early as the 16th century. Previously, rabbis or scholars were exclusively the shadchans, but then brokers looking for money began to pop up.

A Jewish Matchmaker Whose Hand Led Hundreds Down the Aisle

Matchmaker Judith Gottesman. Yesterday, I did a story about a man with a bizarre job. He was helping Spanish banks that wanted to merge with other banks. In my story, I compared this man to a yenta, someone who arranges marriages. And then I got this phone message from my mom, who usually calls to tell me what she thinks of my stories:. It means, like, an old woman, an old gossipy woman.

She was successful and became a matchmaker with Saw You at Sinai, a dating and matchmaking website with an Orthodox bent, although it.

If the impromptu couple ended up getting married, Steinhardt said, he would pay for their honeymoon. But Beroff and the woman had the conversation, and split the money. Beroff regrets it now. The woman involved did not respond to a Jewish Telegraphic Agency inquiry. And I wish I had said that offering to pay people like that is inappropriate. Steinhardt, a former hedge-fund manager who has donated prolifically to Jewish causes, has denied some of the specific allegations and attributes the others to a crude sense of humor.

But organizational heads and philanthropy experts now say that the Jewish communal zeitgeist is moving away from continuity, in part due to a realization that it encourages stereotypes about women and Jewish families. Instead, new groups are stressing values like learning, service or inclusion of intermarried couples. Jewish Federations of North America, the umbrella group for local Jewish fundraising bodies in the U.

For three years beginning in , it hosted TribeFest, a conference whose goal was to bring together young unaffiliated Jews to learn and socialize. But it ended the program in and has moved to young adult programs that are more explicitly about education. As another example of that kind of shift, Spokoiny pointed to OneTable, an initiative that partners with a broad spectrum of organizations to host Shabbat dinners. In the wake of the Steinhardt revelations, some say the communal reckoning over his misdeeds should also include questioning whether American Jewish institutions place too much of a focus on Jewish natalism — that is, making Jewish babies.

At the center of the debate is Birthright Israel, the program, co-founded by Steinhardt, that has brought tens of thousands of young Jews on free trips to Israel.

I Asked the ‘Jewish Tinder’ to Make Me a Match

By subscribing I accept the terms of use. Politics Diaspora Opinion. The Jewish community is always lamenting the high intermarriage rates especially in the United States and Canada destroying the continuity of the Jewish religion, but there are deeper reasons why the rate continues to get higher. Enter the world of Jewish online dating for marriage, the last hope to find your Jewish soul mate, beshert or simply marry within the religion.

“It’s almost like the [matchmakers] are desperate to get the women married because there are so many of them. We don’t sense they tell the.

In Orthodox Jewish circles, dating is limited to the search for a marriage partner. Both sides usually the parents, close relatives or friends of the persons, and the singles themselves, involved make inquiries about the prospective partner, e. A shidduch often begins with a recommendation from family members, friends or others who see matchmaking as a mitzvah , or commandment. Some engage in it as a profession and charge a fee for their services.

Usually a professional matchmaker is called a shadchan , but anyone who makes a shidduch is considered the shadchan for it. After the match has been proposed, the prospective partners meet a number of times to gain a sense of whether they are right for one another. The number of dates prior to announcing an engagement may vary by community.

In some, the dating continues several months. In stricter communities, the couple may decide a few days after originally meeting with each other. Also the age when shidduchim start may vary by community. In frum circles, especially among Hassidim , eighteen is the age when shidduchim start and shadchanim take notice. Those who support marriage by shidduch believe that it complies with traditional Judaism ‘s outlook on Tzniut , modest behaviour in relations between men and women, [1] [4] and prevents promiscuity.

It may also be helpful in small Jewish communities where meeting prospective marriage partners is limited, and this gives them access to a broader spectrum of potential candidates. If the shidduch works out then the couple inform the shadchan of its success.

Season 2, Episode 3: The Double Date



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